Inside the artists mind: Interview with Holly Mingo

Inside the artists mind: Interview with Holly Mingo

When you sign up for a creative collaboration you have no idea where it will take you. We as creators, are just the vessels driving its potential and the art speaks for itself.  So, it’s crazy to think our Bellisa X fashion x art collaboration that ended up this season at New York Fashion Week, in Manhattan (NYFW F/W February 24) all started with an Instagram DM.

However, our best stories lie between the artists mind and the brush strokes. Which is why we’ve caught up with the artist Holly Mingo herself, to discover an insight into her imagination and unique perspective on the creative process. Looking for a change in your perspective of life? This conversation is for you…

 

B: Hey Holly! So much in the art world is focused on the outcome, and rarely is the creative process discussed, let alone credited for. But with your art, it’s a journey that you can visually connect with on the canvas and I’d love to learn more about this. What inspires you to create?

 

H: I start of all my work with 1 line and build it up whilst drawing to music. Nothing is ever planned- the most I see is a faint visual. I love to work in a spontaneous flow state. Over time I’ve developed my signature style, but I never know how the content will end up.

 

B: How does music influence your art?

H: I listen to all genres of music depending on my mood at the time. I generally find that if the music is slower, the art becomes less heavy and has more curved lines. If the tempo is faster, you can expect more block lines. 

 

B: This sounds very therapeutic. I guess you could say, this is your creative flow state?

H: Exactly. I love getting in my zone with my headphones on and exploring the capabilities of mind because I never know what’s coming next. It’s always been a fun outlet, to do on my own and keep myself sane.

 

B: I can feel the creators curiosity coming off strong here, the inner child at play. How did you discover your creative process?

H: At the end of second year uni while I was studying interior design at UWE Bristol, I was giving friends ideas for their record label. During this I decided to try it out for myself and sat down for an hour and drew. It was fun and it came from no-where. This is why it was so unexpectedly magical. You know, free-style with no pressure and people also liked it.

 

 

Holly Mingos artwork featured on Bellisa X fashion collection at this seasons NYFW FW/24, Canoe Studios, Manhattan. 

"I never planned to be an artist, but here I am 4 years later. It was meant to happen but I just didn’t know it!" - 

 

B: Following your love for drawing, is this the only art medium you use ?

H: It’s varied. I started with posca pens, and then the pen turned into 3d painting with acrylic. I’ve spent a lot of time maturing my style, developing, and building apon it.

 

B: A constant exploration that you find fun. I’ve also seen you’ve experimented with the immersive art experience?

H: Live drawing made sense. It’s always freestyle, no mistakes and doesn’t matter if anyone is watching. It’s so important to demonstrate how visuals aid music and vice versa. Ultimately, I want to create stuff you feel like you can be in.

 

B: I can so see this. Immersive within the journey of creation because this is a moment shared. It’s not just about end piece, it’s about being apart of it. Bridging the music, art and thought together. 

H: I like merging music and art- which is which I painted the Shipment Studios (Bristol) and Rebel Records music studios in London that also happened to feature in Central Cee’s "One Up" music video. The people in the studios are subconsciously taking in my work while creating tunes- just like how I use music.

 
 
Holly Mingos artwork featured at the immersive amazement park, Wake The Tiger, Bristol UK and Rebel Records Music studios in London.

"Abstract art is its own language. It’s inclusive and universal like music. You can just enjoy it in the moment , without needing to understand."

 

B: Even though you paint with no judgement, I’m interested to know if you ever get creative blocks?

H: There’s always ideas but I can sometimes find myself doing the same thing so I take this as a sign that I need to reset. I get burn-out more than creative blocks. My friends are like  “do you ever spend time not thinking about art?” That’s because I make It my entire world and forget about anything else.

 

B: How do you recover from creative burn-out?

H: Having a break and seeking inspiration from outside world. You need to regain energy to put it back out. Life is inspiration itself and experiences influence art; I continually try to expand my horizons. It’s important to remember the purpose of your art, that you're creating for you and remove any external pressures.  I’m questioning why am I doing this, where is it coming from and this keeps me connected to my art.'

 

B: That’s so true.  I always tell myself “As long as I make something I love, then its just a bonus if other people like it aswell.”

H: Exactly. That was initial part before social media- but now I have to think about my audience a lot more.

 

B: Ok I have a big question for you. How do you manage the work, life, art balance?

H: Art is part of my life full time. I love it but I’d like stability so I don’t have to use my passion for money all the time. The financial pressure on your art can take the fun out of it sometimes. So, I also freelance graphic design and act in extras for tv and film alongside - I recently acted in Boarders now showing on BBC. 

 

 

Explore the full limited edition made-to-order velour collection with Holly Mingo here

"It's important to keep learning through creative jobs- progress in other avenues so I always have energy to create my art alongside. That way I can keep art for me."

 

B: Love that. Society has somewhat painted this narrative that we should only stick to one career or passion to achieve perfection, but it is so important to keep trying everything that intrigues us and we don’t need to stick to one field. Was there a point you felt like ‘you can do this?’ 

H: I’m grateful for all. Every piece and every experience makes me feel I’ve reached a new level. They each have their own moment. I don’t stop a painting until I reach that feeling.

 

B: What advice would you give to anyone wanting to pursue a career in art?

H: Don’t be scared. I always say, “If not now, when?” If you’re thinking about it, try it with no thought, that’s why I’m not fearless with my art. There’s no anxiety, I can do it when and whenever.

 

B: I guess if you’re creating with no judgement you aren’t worrying about others opinion, as we are always our own biggest critic.

H: Exactly. You’ll be happiest with what’s authentically come from you. By removing what others think it allows so much space for anything to happen. A whole world of anything awaits.

 

Custom black velour, sherpa fleece and abstract Mingo Print panelled tracksuit bottoms designed by the artist herself. You can design your own similar here

"We are all originals, we can create the first of anything."

 

B: Thank you Holly! Letting your mind go and trusting it takes you somewhere guided by your intuitive self-expression. That is the ultimate creative freedom- a ideology we deeply value at Bellisa X, which is what attracted us to collaborate with you in the first place.

 

Feeling inspired? Immerse yourself in the incredible hand-drawn designs by Holly Mingo and embrace the capabilities of your mind. You can enthuse your fashion style by wearing the art of independent artists and support the sewing craftsmanship’s of Bellisa X designs at the same time.

Embody your own creative freedom, and design your own tracksuit featuring the exclusive abstract fabric print collaboration with Holly Mingo. Wearable art: This is the trinity of creativity, right?  

 You design, we make. Explore your artists mind here.

4 new Holly Mingo exclusive abstract prints now available to customise your clothing with on Design Your Own.

 

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